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In this undated image provided by the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, hawkmoths were fixed with tiny radio tags weighing 0.2 grams and tracked using antennas mounted on a Cessna airplane to detect precise locations every five to 15 minutes. Scientists in Germany attached tiny trackers to giant moths looking for clues about insect migration.  (Christian Ziegler/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior via AP)
In this undated image provided by the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, hawkmoths were fixed with tiny radio tags weighing 0.2 grams and tracked using antennas mounted on a Cessna airplane to detect precise locations every five to 15 minutes. Scientists in Germany attached tiny trackers to giant moths looking for clues about insect migration. (Christian Ziegler/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior via AP) AP

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This story was originally published August 11, 2022 1:26 PM.

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